Galanthamine Herb – Uses And Side Effects

Galantamine

Galanthamine comes from the bulbs of a spring flower called common snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis). The herb also is available as a chemical synthetic. A 1983 journal report suggested that Odysseus used the common snowdrop as an antidote to Circe’s poisonous drugs in Homer’s epic poem The Odyssey. ” true, this would have been the first recorded use of galanthamine to reverse drug intoxication.

Common doses of Galanthamine

Galanthamine comes as:

  • coated tablets (5 and 10 milligrams)
  • ampules (5 milligrams).

Some experts recommend the following dose:

  • For Alzheimer’s disease, initially 5 milligrams taken three times daily, then increased to 30 to 40 milligrams daily.

Uses of Galanthamine

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Myasthenia gravis
  • Post-polio paralyses
  • To reverse neuromuscular blockade (in which drugs are giver to stop unwanted muscle movement)

Side effects of Galanthamine

Call your health care practitioner if you experience any of these possible side effects of galanthamine:

Interactions

Combining herbs with certain drugs may alter their action or produce unwanted side effects. Don’t use galanthamine while taking drugs to relieve depression called MAO inhibitors (such as Marplan and Nardil) or if you’ve been exposed to organophosphate fertilizers (used in gardens and on farms).

Important points to remember

  • Don’t use this herb if you have a slow pulse, extremely poor muscle tone, recent heart attack, epilepsy, unusually increased muscle activity, Parkinson’s disease, diabetic crisis, or a blockage of the. respiratory, digestive, or urinary tract.
  • Consult your health care practitioner before taking galanthamine.
  • Remember that established treatments are available for the conditions for which galanthamine is used.
  • Avoid hazardous activities until you know how the herb affects you.

What the research shows

Some research supports galanthamine’s use in Alzheimer’s disease, and scientists can predict its effects and safety. More studies are needed to define its exact role in treating this condition. Meanwhile, medical experts emphasize that proven drugs are available, so using galanthamine is questionable.

Other names for Galanthamine : –

Other names for galanthamine Other names for galanthamine include galanthamine hydrobromide.

A product containing galanthamine is sold as Nivalin.

Useful References

Galangal Herb – Uses And Side Effects

Galangal

Galangal is a tropical herbaceous plant of the ginger family reaching to about 2m (6 1/2ft). The blade-like leaves are long and wide, 50 x 9cm (18 x 31/2in); the flowers are greenish white with a dark-red veined tip. The fruits are red berries. The rhizomes are orange to brown and ringed at intervals by the yellowish remnants of atrophied leaf bases.

Galangal is the dried root of Alpinia officinarum, a native plant of eastern and southeastern Asia. The herb is botanically and chemically related to ginger.

Common doses of Galangal

Galangal comes as a dried root. Some experts recommend the following dose:

  • 1 gram taken orally.

Uses of Galangal

The use of greater galangal is confined to local Indonesian dishes such as curries. Although known in Europe since the Middle Ages, galangal is now used only in Far Eastern cookery from Indonesia, IndoChina, Malaya, Singapore and Thailand. Like ginger, galangal is a ‘de-fisher’ and so appears frequently in fish and shellfish recipes often with garlic, ginger, chilli and lemon or tamarind. Laos powder is more important than kencur and, as well as with fish, is used in a wide variety of dishes such as sauces, soups, satays and sambals, chicken, meat and vegetable curries.

Attributed Medicinal Properties

Resembling ginger in its effects, galangal is an aromatic stimulant, carminative and stomachic. It is used against nausea, flatulence, dyspepsia, rheumatism, catarrh and enteritis. It also possesses tonic and antibacterial qualities and is used for these properties in veterinary and homeopathic medicine. Specifically, galangal may help to :-

  • Fungal infections
  • Rheumatism (painful joints and muscles)

Side effects of Galangal

Call your health care practitioner if you experience diarrhea, nausea, or vomiting when using galangal.

Interactions

Combining herbs with certain drugs may alter their action or produce unwanted side effects. Tell your health care practitioner about any prescription or nonprescription drugs you’re taking.

Important points to remember

  • Don’t take galangal if you are pregnant, suspect you’re pregnant, or are planning to become pregnant.
  • Avoid this herb if you have a chronic digestive tract disease.
  • Consult your health care practitioner before taking this herb.

What the research shows

Galangal hasn’t been thoroughly tested as a treatment for rheumatic disorders or fungal infections. Until more research is done on its benefits and potential risks, medical experts won’t recommend it.

Other names for Galangal : –

Other names for galangal include Alpinia officinarum, China root, Chinese ginger, colic root, East Indian root, galanga, kaempferia galanga, and rhizoma galangae.

No known products containing galangal are available commercially.

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Fumitory Herb – Uses And Side Effects

Fumitory

Fumitory is an annual plant found practically everywhere on earth, mostly around areas where other plants are cultivated. The sub-erect, hollow stem is angular, smooth, and bluish hued. The leaves are alternate, gray-green and bi- or tri-pinnate with small, narrow divisions. The herb is small and slender, with weak, straggling, or climbing stems, decompound leaves, and clusters or spikes of small flowers of a pinkish hue, topped with purple, or more rarely, white. The leaves have no odour, but taste bitter and saline. The leaves and flowers are used to produce herbal preparations.

Common doses of Fumitory

Fumitory comes as dried herb, a liquid extract, and a tincture. Some experts recommend the following doses:

  • As dried herb, 2 to 4 grams taken orally three times daily.
  • As a tea, 2 to 4 grams of the dried herb steeped in hot water and taken orally three times daily.
  • As liquid extract (1: 1 in 25% alcohol), 2 to 4 milliliters taken orally three times daily.
  • As a tincture (1:5 in 45% alcohol), 1 to 4 milliliters taken orally three times daily.

Uses of Fumitory

Fumitory has a long history of use in the treatment of skin problems such as eczema and acne. Its action is probably due to a general cleansing mediated via the kidneys and liver. Specifically, fumitory may help to :-

  • Constipation
  • Fluid retention
  • Heart problems related to coronary blood flow disorders
  • Galbladder and liver diseases
  • Skin eruptions

Side effects of Fumitory

Call your health care practitioner if you experience any of these possible side effects of fumitory:

  • low blood pressure symptoms, such as dizziness and weakness
  • sedation
  • slow pulse.

At high or toxic doses, fumitory can cause seizures. The herb also can increase pressure within the eye, causing glaucoma (which may lead to vision loss).

Interactions

Combining herbs with certain drugs may alter their action or produce unwanted side effects. Don’t use fumitory while taking:

  • drugs used to lower blood pressure
  • heart drugs called beta blockers (such as Inderal)
  • heart drugs called calcium channel blockers (such as Calan and Procardia)
  • Lanoxin and other drugs that slow the heart rate.

Important points to remember

  • Don’t take fumitory if you’re pregnant or breast-feeding.
  • Avoid this herb if you have glaucoma or an illness that makes you prone to seizures.
  • If you use fumitory, report light-headedness, weakness, shortness of breath, or pulse rate changes to your health care practitioner.

What the research shows

Researchers haven’t tested fumitory on people, so its safety and usefulness remain unproven.

Other names for Fumitory : –

Other names for fumitory include earth smoke, hedge fumitory, and wax dolls.

No known products containing fumitory are available commercially.

Flax Herb – Uses And Side Effects

flax

Herbalists today use soluble fiber made from mature flax seeds (Linum usitatissimum) for cures and poultices The plant has a more varied history, though. Archeologists have traced flax seeds and fibers back 10,000 years, when prehistoric people wove it into clothing. American settlers used flax to make fabrics called linsey-woolsey and linen. Linseed oil, expressed from flaxseeds, is used in paints and varnishes. Researchers currently are looking for more uses for flax. Its cultivation reaches back to the remotest periods of history, Flax seeds as well as the woven cloth having been found in Egyptian tombs. It has been cultivated in all temperate and tropical regions for so many centuries that its geographical origin cannot be identified, for it readily escapes from cultivation and is found in a semi-wild condition in all the countries where it is grown.

Flaxseed cakes are used as cattle feed. Flax also has been a source of waxes and waterproofing products. Folklore about the slimy residue of flaxseeds includes tales of people falling into large vats of seeds and drowning. Flax has a broad array of health benefits but may be more familiar to Americans for its industrial uses as it is the core component in linen for clothing, linseed oil for paints and varnish and a host of other products.

Common doses of flax

Flax is available as:

  • powder
  • capsules
  • softgel capsules (1,000 milligrams)
  • oil

Some experts recommend the following doses:

  • For all internal uses, 1 to 2 tablespoons of oil or mature seeds taken orally in two or three equal daily doses.
  • For topical use, 30 to 50 grams of flax meal applied as a hot, moist poultice or compress, as needed.

Uses of flax

Flax seed improves every molecule in the body: it improves the quality of hair, nails, and skin, as well as helping you to lose weight or bulk up it lowers cholesterol, blood pressure and prevents arthritis and cancers. Specifically, flax may help to :-

  • Atherosclerosis (plaque buidup in the arteries)
  • Colon problems caused by laxative abuse
  • Constipation
  • Diverticulitis (inflammatory disease of the intestine)
  • High cholesterol
  • Maintains nerves
  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Skin inflammation

Side effects of flax

Call your health care practitioner if you experience any of these possible side effects of flax:

All plant parts contain harmful substances. Stay alert for overdose symptoms-shortness of breath, rapid breathing, , and poor muscle coordination progressing to paralysis and seizures.

Interactions

Combining herbs with certain drugs may alter their action or produce unwanted side effects. Don’t use flax when taking:

  • laxatives
  • oral drugs
  • stool softeners.

Important points to remember

  • Don’t use flax if you’re pregnant or breast-feeding because it may harm the fetus or cause miscarriage.
  • Don’t use flax if you have prostate cancer or constipation.
  • Never eat immature flaxseeds.
  • Keep flax away from children and pets.
  • If you use flax, drink plenty of fluids to minimize intestinal gas.
  • Tell your health care practitioner if other drugs you’re taking seem less effective.
  • Refrigerate flaxseed oil to prevent its breakdown.
  • Remember that proven cholesterol-lowering treatments are available. Flax, on the other hand, is unproven.

What the research shows

Use of flax as a source of omega-3 fatty acids and to treat inflammatory diseases deserves more investigation. But most of the herb’s uses aren’t proven. Also, researchers haven’t analyzed the herb’s potentially harmful chemicals for long-term effects.

Other names for flax : –

Other names for flax include flaxseed, linseed, lint bells, and linum.

Products containing flax are sold under such names as Barlean’s Flax Oil, Barlean’s Vita-Flax, and Flaxseed.

Useful References

Figwort Herb – Uses And Side Effects

figwort

The figwort is 3 to l0 feet high with 4-angled stems widely branched above and slender-stemmed, somewhat egg-shaped or lance-shaped sharply toothed leaves 3 to 9 inches long. The numerous small, greenish-purple flowers are produced from July to September in rather open panicles. A tall, snapdragon-like plant, figwort goes by the botanical names Scrophularia nodosa and S. ningpoensis. Usually, herbalists use the dried leaves and flowers, although the Chinese also use the root.

Common doses of figwort

Figwort comes as a tincture, compress, soak, and wash. Some experts recommend the following doses, although they disagree on how often to take the herb:

  • As an infusion, 2 to 8 grams of dried herb taken orally.
  • As liquid extract, 2 to 8 milliliters taken orally.
  • As tincture, 2 to 4 milliliters taken orally.

Uses of figwort

Figwort finds most use in the treatment of skin problems. It acts in a broad way to help the body function well, bringing about a state of inner cleanliness. Specifically, figwort may help to :-

  • Chronic skin conditions
  • Digestive disorders
  • Eczema (a type of skin inflammation)
  • Inflammation
  • Itching
  • Psoriasis (scaly, raised skin patches)
  • To stimulate the heart

Side effects of figwort

Call your health care practitioner if you experience any of these possible side effects of figwort:

Figwort also can cause a type of irregular heartbeat called heart block.

Interactions

Combining herbs with certain drugs may alter their action or produce unwanted side effects. Don’t use figwort while taking:

  • digitalis drugs used to treat heart failure or certain irregular heartbeats
  • heart drugs called beta blockers (such as Inderal)
  • heart drugs called calcium channel blockers (such as Calan and Procardia).

Important points to remember

  • Don’t use figwort if you have heart disease.
  • Avoid this herb if you’re pregnant or breast-feeding.
  • Call your health care practitioner if you experience light-headedness, weakness, shortness of breath, or pulse rate changes.

What the research shows

Researchers haven’t studied figwort to identify possible benefits and safety risks. However, medical experts warn people-especially those with heart disease-not to use it.

Other names for figwort : –

Other names for figwort include carpenter’s-square, common figwort, rose-noble, scrofula plant, square stalk, stinking christopher, and throatwort.

Useful References

Feverfew Herb – Uses And Side Effects

Feverfew

A European plant now cultivated in the United States and Canada, feverfew bears yellow flowers and yellow-green leaves from July to October. Usually, the leaves are dried or used fresh in teas and extracts. The most common botanical name for feverfew is Chrysanthemum parthenium.

Feverfew tree grow to heights of between 9 inches and 2 feet. The deeply cut leaves are brightly colored and have a sharp, unpleasantly bitter taste. The flowers, which are produced from summer until mid-fall, are thick and daisy like with yellow centers.

The chemical parthenolide has the highest concentration in the leaves and flowering tops during the summer, before the seeds are set. The parthenolide level drops rapidly thereafter. This may explain the difference in parthenolide levels between brands of feverfew capsules and tablets. The herb was somewhat forgotten, however, until the late 1970s. That’s when migraine sufferers started talking about feverfew’s potential to ward off these often debilitating headaches

Common doses of feverfew

Feverfew is available as:

  • capsules (pure leaf-380 milligrams; leaf extract 250 milligrams)
  • liquid
  • tablets (commonly used to make infusions or teas).

Some experts recommend the following doses:

  • To treat migraine, 543 micrograms of parthenolide taken orally daily.
  • To prevent migraine, 25 milligrams of freeze-dried leaf extract taken orally daily; 50 milligrams of leaf taken orally daily with food; or 50 to 200 milligrams of aboveground plant parts taken orally daily.

Uses of feverfew herb

The herb is now thought to contain numerous compounds that affect the body in beneficial ways. Its effectiveness for a variety of ailments, including rheumatoid arthritis, is being explored. Specifically, feverfew may help to :-

Side effects of feverfew

Call your health care practitioner if you experience any of these possible side effects of feverfew:

  • allergic reaction
  • mouth sores
  • post-feverfew syndrome-moderate to severe pain with stiff joints and muscles after discontinuing the herb.
  • Skin contact with the feverfew plant can cause a rash in some cases.

Interactions

Combining herbs with certain drugs may alter their action or produce unwanted side effects. Tell your health care practitioner about any prescription or nonprescription drugs you’re taking.

Important points to remember

  • Don’t use feverfew if you’re pregnant or breast-feeding.
  • Stay alert for an allergic reaction, mouth sores, and skin sores.
  • To avoid the discomfort of post-feverfew syndrome, discontinue the herb gradually, not abruptly.
  • Avoid abruptly ending a daily feverfew regimen, as headaches may resume.

What the research shows

A few studies found feverfew effective in preventing migraines. However, researchers must conduct more studies to establish better dosage guidelines and identify specific drug interactions.

Feverfew may be the only treatment that can prevent migraines in people who don’t benefit from standard drug therapy. Although experts disagree on what dose to take, standardized feverfew preparations with doses based on parthenolide content have brought the best results in experiments.

Other names for feverfew : –

Other names for fever few include altamisa, bachelors’ button, chamomile grande,featherfew, featherfoil, febrifuge plant, midsummer daisy, mutterkraut, nosebleed, Santa Maria, wild chamomile, and wild quinine.

Products containing feverfew are sold under such names Feverfew, Feverfew Glyc, and Feverfew Power.

Useful References

Fenugreek Herb – Uses And Side Effects

Fenugreek Leaves

Fenugreek is one of the world’s oldest medicinal herbs. It has a variety of uses, including increasing breastmilk production. Fenugreek, or Trigonella foenum-graecum, is native to countries along the Mediterranean’s eastern shore. The plant is cultivated in India, Egypt, Morocco and, occasionally, England. Herbalists use only the seeds, which grow in sicklelike pods. Each pod contains about 10 to 20 brownish seeds.

An erect 2 to 3 foot tall annual herb with light green leaves and small white flowers. The seed pods contain 10 to 20 small, flat, yellow-brown, pungent, aromatic seeds to a pod. The seeds have a strong aroma and somewhat bitter  taste, variously described as similar to celery, maple syrup, or burnt  sugar.

Fenugreek smells and tastes like maple syrup. In fact, drinking fenugreek tea may cause the urine to smell like maple syrup. People used to add the herb to liquid medicines to mask the taste.

Common doses of Fenugreek

Fenugreek is available as unprocessed seeds, extracts in liquid and spray, seeds in a dried powder or capsules, and a poultice. Some experts recommend the following doses:

  • As seeds, I to 6 grams taken orally three times daily.
  • As a powdered drug, dissolve 50 grams in 1/4 liter of water and apply topically.

Uses of Fenugreek

The major use of fenugreek is in curry powders, figuring in many mixtures, especially vindaloo and the hot curries of Sri Lanka. It is an ingredient of Panch phoron, the Indian five-spice mixture. In homemade powders, the amount used can be controlled, but in cheap bought powders it often overpowers. Some of the medicinal uses of fenugreek are:-

Side effects of Fenugreek

Call your health care practitioner if you experience any of these possible side effects of fenugreek:

  • bleeding
  • bruising
  • headache
  • low blood sugar symptoms, such as dizziness, hunger, trembling, profuse sweating, and a fast pulse.

Interactions

Combining herbs with certain drugs may alter their action or produce unwanted side effects. Tell your health care
practitioner about any prescription or nonprescription drugs you’re taking, especially drugs that lower blood sugar.

Don’t use fenugreek while taking:

  • blood thinners such as Coumadin .
  • Other oral drugs.

Important points to remember

  • Don’t use fenugreek if you’re pregnant because it may stimulate uterine contractions.
  • Tell your health care practitioner if you experience unusual bleeding or bruising or if other drugs you’re taking seem less effective while using fenugreek.
  • If you’re diabetic, check your blood sugar carefully until you know how fenugreek affects it.
  • Learn about low blood sugar symptoms and management of it.
  • If you’re using fenugreek to lower your blood sugar or cholesterol level, remember that effective and tested drugs are available.
  • Be aware that the Food and Drug Administration says fenugreek is “generally recommended as safe” at concentrations below 0.05%.

What the research shows

Although fenugreek may hold promise in treating diabetes and high cholesterol, researchers haven’t tested the herb on people. What’s more, existing drugs have proven benefits in these conditions.

Other names for Fenugreek : –

Other names for fenugreek include bird’s-foot, greek hayseed, and trigonella.

Preparation and Storage

Dried seeds should be lightly roasted before using (don’t overdo it though, or they will become bitter). After roasting, they are easily ground. A small amount will complement many other spices, but too much can be overpowering. If the seeds are required as part of a curry paste they can be soaked overnight to swell and soften, and be easily mixed with the other ingredients.

Products containing fenugreek are sold under such names as fenugreek seed and fenu-thyme.

Useful References

Fennel Herb – Uses And Side Effects

Fennel

Fennel usually is obtained from the seeds of foeniculum vulgare, from which the essential oil is extracted. Some people also use the plant’s root for cooking or other purposes.

Fennel, a hardy, perennial, umbelliferous herb, with yellow flowers and feathery leaves, grows wild in most parts of temperate Europe, but is generally considered indigenous to the shores of the Mediterranean, whence it spreads eastwards to India. It has followed civilization, especially where Italians have colonized, and may be found growing wild in many parts of the world upon dry soils near the sea-coast and upon river-banks. Seeds should be sown directly in the garden in the late spring. Seedlings do not transplant well. The deep taproots are difficult to pull up, so remove unwanted seedlings while young. The plant will self-sow generously. To maintain a continuous supply of fresh leaves throughout the season, sow a few seeds every 10 days.

Common doses of Fennel

Fennel comes as volatile oil in water-2% (Sweet Fennel) and 4% (Bitter Fennel). Some experts recommend the following dose:

  • For digestive problems, 0.1 to 0.6 milliliter of the oil taken daily or 5 to 7 grams of the fruit taken daily.

Uses of Fennel herb

As a herb, fennel leaves are used in French and Italian cuisine’s in sauces for fish and in mayonnaise. In Italy fennel is also used to season pork roasts and spicy sausages, especially the Florentine salami finocchiona

  • To enhance sex drive
  • To increase lactation in breast-feeding women
  • To promate childbirth and delivery
  • To stimulate menstruation
  • Chinese and Hindus used it as a snakebite remedy

Other Uses

Chew the seeds as a breath freshener.

Side effects of Fennel

Call your health care practitioner if you experience any of these possible side effects of fennel:

  • nausea
  • skin irritation from sunlight exposure
  • pulmonary edema
  • seizures
  • tumors

Interactions

Combining herbs with certain drugs may alter their action or produce unwanted side effects. Tell your health care practitioner about any prescription or nonprescription drugs you’re taking.

Important points to remember

  • Know that you could be allergic to fennel if you’re allergic to members of the same plant family, such as celery, carrots, or mugwort.
  • Don’t use fennel medicinally if you’re pregnant or breast-feeding.
  • Stay out of the sun if you experience skin irritation.
  • If you grow fennel, don’t confuse it with hemlock, which may cause death if eaten.

What the research shows

Because fennel hasn’t been studied scientifically, medical experts don’t recommend using the herb to treat any medical condition.

Other names for Fennel : –

Other names for fennel include aneth fenouil, bitter fennel, carosella, common fennel, fenchel, fenchel, fenouille, finocchio, Florence fennel, funcho, garden fennel, hinojo, large fennel, sweet fennel, and wild fennel.

Preparation and Storage

Seeds can be used whole or ground in a spice mill or mortar and pestle. Store away from light in airtight containers.

Products containing fennel are sold under such names as Bitter Fennel and Sweet Fennel.

Useful References

False Unicorn Root Herb – Uses And Side Effects

False Unicorn Root Herb

False Unicorn Root is a flowering herb originally found in moist areas east of the Mississippi river but also common in other southern states. False unicorn root is extracted from the root system of Chamaelirium luteum in autumn. Native to North America, the plant usually is harvested from the wild. From 1916 to 1947, false unicorn root was listed as a “uterine tonic” and diuretic in the U.S. National Formulary, a list of drugs and their formulas.

False Unicorn Root contains the constituent Chamaelirin, a fatty acid. The herb is considered an emetic, tonic, diuretic, and Vermifuge. In large doses, False Unicorn Root is a cardiac poison, but is of greatest value in female disorders of the reproductive organs.

Common doses of false unicorn root

False unicorn root comes as dried root, chopped root for decoction, tincture, and a component of tablets used for menopause symptoms. Some experts recommend the following dose:

  • For menopause symptoms, 8 to 10 drops of tincture taken orally four to six times daily. Or, if using a decoction, drink 1/2 cup twice daily.

Uses of false unicorn root herb

  • Liver disorders
  • Menstrual problems
  • Uterine problems
  • “Weakness”of the genital and urinary tracts
  • It is also a good remedy in albuminaria.

Side effects of false unicorn root

Call your health care practitioner if you experience unusual symptoms when using false unicorn root

Interactions

Combining herbs with certain drugs may alter their action or produce unwanted side effects. Tell your health care practitioner about any prescription or nonprescription drugs you’re taking.

Important points to remember

  • Don’t use false unicorn root if you’re pregnant or breast-feeding.
  • Be aware that the herb’s purported benefits may take months to appear.
What the research shows

Scientific studies don’t support the use of false unicorn root for conditions of the uterus and ovaries. The herb hasn’t been studied in people.

Other names for false unicorn root : –

Other names for false unicorn root include blazing star, fairywand, helonias dioica, and starwort.

No known products containing false unicorn root are available commercially.

Useful References

Eyebright Herb – Uses And Side Effects

eyebright

Euphrasia officinalis, the plant that eyebright comes from, has been used since the Middle Ages to treat bloodshot or irritated eyes-a practice that evolveg because the spotted and striped flowers resemble bloodshot eyes. An annual, E. officinalis/is grows to roughly 1 foot tall.

Common doses of eyebright

Eyebright comes as a lotion or an infusion to drink.

Some experts recommend the following doses:

  • As an eye compress, soak a pad in an infusion of eye bright and apply it to your eyes.
  • As an eyewash, use 5 to 10 drops of tincture in water.
  • As an infusion, steep eyebright in boiling water and take orally.

Uses of eyebright herb

Eye Bright is one of the primary herbs used for eye care. It has been depended upon for at least 2000 years in the treatment of various eye problems. It is especially useful for eyestrain, over-sensitivity to light, eye inflammations, weeping eyes and other eye ailments. Some common eyes disorder in which eyebright use are:-

Side effects of eyebright

Call your health care practitioner if you experience any of these possible side effects of eyebright:

  • sneezing
  • headache
  • stuffy nose
  • itching
  • unusual eye sensitivity
  • red, swollen eyelid rims to light
  • severe pressure in the eyes with tearing
  • vision problems
  • weakness

Interactions

Combining herbs with certain drugs may alter their action or produce unwanted side effects. Tell your health Care practitioner about any prescription or nonprescription drugs you’re taking.

Important points to remember

  • Don’t use this herb to treat an eye condition because it may lead to eye infection.
  • Medical experts caution against using eyebright because it may cause cell damage.
  • Report vision changes or eye swelling, redness, or discharge to your health Care practitioner.
  • Wear sunglasses and avoid bright light when using this herb.

What the research shows

Scientific studies don’t support the use of eyebright for eye problems. Medical experts caution that herbal preparations generally carry a high risk of infection because they may not be sterile.

Other names for eyebright : –

Other names for eyebright include meadow eyebright and red eyebright.

There are many commercial eyewash products containing Eyebright, plus other herbs such as Goldenseal, Bayberry, Raspberry leaves, and Cayenne pepper. To use, put eyewash in an cup, and rinse out the eye 3 to 4 times daily.

Useful References