Eucalyptus Herb – Uses And Side Effects

Eucalyptus

Herbal eucalyptus products come from the leaves of the eucalyptus globulus labill plant. The herb was first used more than 100 years ago to relieve stuffy nose.

Eucalyptus is a diverse genus of trees (rarely shrubs), the members of which dominate the tree flora of Australia . There are almost 600 species of Eucalyptus , mostly native to Australia, with a very small number found in adjacent parts of New Guinea and Indonesia .

Eucalyptus trees have dotted the Australian landscape for millions of years, and today they are probably the most common trees on the continent. Eucalyptus, able to survive poor soil, dry spells, and fire, is hardy enough to have spread throughout much of the land and take a central place in the lives of the forest’s wildlife.

Common doses of eucalyptus

Eucalyptus is available as an oil and a lotion. Some experts recommend the following doses:

  • For various uses, 0.05 to 0.2 milliliters of eucalyptol, 0.05 to 0.2 milliliter of eucalyptus oil, or 2 to 4 grams of fluid extract taken orally.
  • For topical use, mix 30 milliliters of oil with 500 milliliters of water

Use eucalyptus herb

  • Nasal congestion
  • Asthma
  • Coughs and aid in digestion

Side effects of eucalyptus

Call your health care practitioner if you experience any of these possible side effects of eucalyptus:

  • bluish gray skin
  • burning sensation in the stomach
  • delirium
  • dizziness
  • muscle weakness
  • nausea
  • small pupils

Eucalyptus also can cause seizures

Interactions

Combining herbs with certain drugs may alter their action or produce unwanted side effects. Tell your health care practitioner about any prescription or nonprescription drugs you’re taking.

Important points to remember

  • Avoid eucalyptus products if you’re pregnant or breast-feeding.
  • Don’t use eucalyptus oil if you’re taking drugs or other treatments to lower your blood sugar.
  • Dilute the herb before you swallow it or apply it to your skin.
  • Keep eucalyptus oil away from children and pets.

What the research shows

Although many people take eucalyptus, scientists have little information to support claims for its medicinal use. Until researchers test the herb’s ability to combat infections, medical experts recommend using established drugs, not eucalyptus, to treat infections.

Other names for eucalyptus : –

Other names for eucalyptus include fevertree, gum tree, and Tasmanian blue gum.

Products containing eucalyptus are sold under such names as Eucalyptamint and Eucalyptus Oil.

Useful References

Ephedra Herb – Uses And Side Effects

Ephedra

It has been used in China for more than 4000 years to treat symptoms of asthma and upper respiratory infections. Varieties of the herb are also grown in Europe, India, Australia and Afghanistan. In the United States, the herb has street names of “natural ecstasy” as a stimulant and “natural fen-phen” as a diet aid. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warns against using the diet aid and has banned on 12 April, 2004 the stimulant version.

This herb comes from the ephedra species-an evergreen with a pinelike odor that grows in certain desert regions of Asia and the United States. Of the many ephedra species, the most common are Ephedra sinica and E. nevadensis. Herbalists use parts of the plant’s seeds and stems.

Common doses of ephedra

Ephedra comes as unprocessed extracts of root and aboveground parts, tablets (approximately 7 milligrams), and teas. Some experts recommend the following dose:

  • As a tea, place V2 ounce of dried branches in a pint of boiling water and steep for 10 to 20 minutes.

Be aware that the FDA prohibits the sale of ephedra in quantities of 8 milligrams or more per dose and cautions against taking more than 8 milligrams every 6 hours or more than 24 milligrams daily. The FDA also warns not to use ephedra products for more than 7 days in a row.

Uses of ephedra herb

Ephedra has been used for thousands of years and is considered safe when used by healthy people. Ma huang (Ephedra sinica) is a mild engergizing herb that suppresses appetite and promotes thermogenic metabolism and increases perspiration and stimulates the nervous system. Some of the common ailement which can dure by ephedra herb are:-

  • Bronchial asthma
  • Chills
  • Common cold
  • Fever
  • Flu
  • Fluid retention
  • Headache
  • Joint pain
  • Nasal congestion
  • To stimulate the nervous system
  • To suppress the appetite

Side effects of ephedra

Call your health care practitioner if you experience any of these possible side effects of ephedra:

This herb also can cause heart attacks, psychosis, and uterine contractionsis.

Interactions

Combining herbs with certain drugs may alter their action or produce unwanted side effects. Don’t use this herb with:

  • drugs to relieve depression called MAO inhibitors (such as Marplan and Nardil)
  • ephedrine
  • heart drugs called beta blockers (such as Inderal)
  • phenothiazines such as Thorazine, used for anxiety, nausea, vomiting, or psychosis
  • Sudafed
  • Theo-Dur.

Important points to remember

  • Don’t take ephedra if you’re pregnant because it can stimulate the uterus.
  • Be aware that many of the heart attacks, seizures, and strokes reported to the FDA occurred in previously healthy young adults using ephedra.
  • Know that the FDA has linked 17 deaths and hundreds of serious side effects to ephedra products containing the alkaloid ephedrine.
  • Avoid ephedra if you have heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, or an enlarged prostate.
  • Watch for side effects-especially chest pain, shortness of breath, palpitations, dizziness, or fainting-when using ephedra. Seek medical help immediately if you experience any of these.
  • Take less than 8 milligrams every 6 hours and never more than 24 milligrams daily. Also, don’t use ephedra for more than 7 consecutive days.

What the research shows

Scientists believe the main components in some Ephedra species may be valuable in treating certain conditions, especially fluid retention. However, standardized formulations of ephedra’s active chemicals are available over the counter, so medical experts don’t recommend taking the herbal product.

Other names for ephedra : –

Other names for ephedra include brigham tea, cao ma huang (Chinese ephedra), desert tea, epitonin, herba ephedrae, herbal, joint fir, ma huang, mahuuanggen (root), Mexican tea, Mormon tea, muzei mu huang (Mongolian ephedra), natural ecstasy, popotillo, sea grape, squaw tea, teamster’s tea, yellow astringent, yellow horse, and zhong ma huang (intermediate ephedra).

Products containing ephedra are sold under such names as Herbal Fen-Phen, Power Trim.

Useful References

Elecampane Herb – Uses And Side Effects

Elecampane

Elecampane enjoys roadside areas, and damp fields and pastures. Plant it in full sun in a damp, but not soggy, location. It is a perennial that grows 3 – 6 feet tall. The root is most commonly used. In France and Switzerland, elecampane root was used to prepare absinthe, a potent cordial popular at the turn of the century. In Europe and Asia, the herb has been used as a remedy for centuries.

Elecampane comes from the dried roots and rhizomes (underground stems) of 2- to 3-year-old Inula helenium plants. This perennial herb, native to the temperate regions of Europe, Asia, and Africa, has yellow flowers with large heads. Elecampane is a source of inulin (also known as fructosan), a carbohydrate-based fiber that is broken down and absorbed in the colon instead of in the upper digestive tract where most other foods are digested.

Common doses of elecampane

Elecampane comes as powdered root preparations, fluid extracts, and lotions. Some experts recommend the following doses:

  • As fresh root, 1 to 2 tablespoons taken orally three times daily.
  • As dried root, 2 to 3 grams taken orally three times daily.
  • As extract, 3 grams of dried root in 20 milliliters of alcohol and 10 milliliters water taken orally three times daily.
  • Experts disagree on what dose to take.

Use elecampane herb for common disorders

Traditionally, elecampane has been taken to treat respiratory conditions such as asthma and bronchitis because chemicals in it cause mucus to become thinner. However, it is also useful in following ailments:-

  • Asthma
  • Bronchitis
  • Cough
  • Fluid retention
  • Indigestion
  • Lung disease
  • Mycobacterium tuberculoses (a type of tuberculosis)
  • Snakebite
  • To stimulate the appetite

Side effects of elecampane

  • Call your health care practitioner if you experience a skin reaction after coming in contact with elecampane.

Interactions

Combining herbs with certain drugs may alter their action or produce unwanted side effects. Tell your health care practitioner about any prescription or nonprescription drugs you’re taking.

Important points to remember

  • Watch for skin inflammation after contact with elecampane.
  • If you have allergies, wear long sleeves and gloves when handling the herb.

What the research shows

Researchers believe elecampane may have value as an expectorant, an antiseptic, and a mild digestive stimulant. However, well-designed human studies haven’t been done. The herb seems to be safe and well tolerated, but medical supervision is still recommended.

Other names for elecampane : –

Other names for elecampane include aunee, elf dock, elfwort, horseheal, scabwort, velvet dock, and wild sunflower.

No known products containing elecampane are available commercially.

Useful References

Elderberry Herb – Uses And Side Effects

Elderberry

People once used elderberry as an insect repellent, placing sprays of the flower In horses’ bridles or adding powdered flowers to water and dabbing it on the skin. Some people mix elderberry with sage, lemon juice, vinegar, and honey to use as a gargle. Elderberry juice has been used In hair dye and scented ointments. Children sometimes make pipes or pea-shooters from the hollowed stems of the elder sometimes suffering cyanide poisoning as a result.

Elderberry, is small tree that grows to 12 feet and is native to North America. The European elder (nigra) grows to 30 feet, is found throughout Europe, Asia, North Africa, and has been naturalized in the United States. The tree has been called “the medicine chest of the common people. Several trees and shrubs of the Sambucus species, such as S. nigra and S. canadensis, produce elderberries. Herbalists typically use the flowers and berries, probably because the inner bark and leaves contain most of the potentially poisonous substances.

Common doses of elderberry

Elderberry comes as:

  • ointments and aqueous solutions of the bark and leaves
  • oils
  • solutions
  • Wine

Experts disagree on what dose to take.

Therapeutic actions of the elder plant include:

An astringent, immuno-stimulant, emetic, expectorant, diaphoretic, laxative, diuretic, sedative, and anti-inflammatory.

Serve it Hot for: Colds, sore throat, fever and flu.
Serve it Cold for: spring tonics, blood purifiers and diuretics.

Uses elderberry herb in following disorders:-

Side effects of elderberry

Call your health care practitioner if you experience any of these possible side effects of elderberry:

  • diarrhea (from S. ebulus berries or leaves of any Sambucus species)
  • vomiting (from eating a lot of S. racemosa berries.

Ingesting the bark, roots, leaves, or unripe berries of the elderberry plant can cause cyanide poisoning.

Interactions

Combining herbs with certain drugs may alter their action or produce unwanted side effects. Tell your health care practitioner about any prescription or nonprescription drugs you’re taking.

Important points to remember

  • Use elderberry products with caution because of the risk of cyanide poisoning.
  • Never eat the plant’s leaves, stems, or green parts. They’re poisonous.
  • Don’t use this herb if you’re pregnant or breast-feeding.
  • Avoid anything made with berries of the dwarf elder (S. ebulus), thought to be especially poisonous. Large doses can cause vertigo, vomiting, and diarrhea (symptoms of cyanide poisoning).
  • Never eat uncooked elderberries because of the risk of cyanide poisoning.
  • Know that eating 60 milligrams of cyanide has caused death. Keep the elderberry plant away from children and pets, and have the telephone number for the nearest poison control center handy.

What the research shows

Medical experts don’t recommend using elderberry products as laxatives because of the risk of cyanide poisoning. Besides, many safe, effective laxatives and cathartics are available. The same is true for the other conditions for which elderberries have been used. For instance, many proven anti-inflammatory products are available to treat rheumatism symptoms.

Other names for elderberry : –

Other names for elderberry include antelope brush (Sambucus tridentata), black elder (S. nigra),blue elderberry (S.caerulea), boretree, common elder (8. canadensis), danewort (S. ebulus), dwarf elder, elder, European elder, pipe tree, red elderberry, redfruited elder (S. pubens,S. racemosa), Sambucus, and sweet elder.

Products containing elderberry are sold under such names as Elderberry Power and Elder Flowers.

Useful References

Dopamine: A Natural Antidepressant Substance

Dopamine

Dopamine is essentially a natural antidepressant. When our brains work normally, this neurotransmitter sends out signals to our body. This practice helps regulate all sorts of functions, including emotions.

Additional Functions

Besides helping you remain positive, this substance also is responsible for motor functioning/control of movement, motivation, and feeling of pleasure. It stabilizes your brain and helps manage the information that travels to a variety of places in the brain.

This substance acts as chemical messenger and often plays a role in addictions. Administering this substance in a drug format, however, does not seem to be effective. It does not do very well in treating the central nervous system.

Home Care

Although a drug cannot be made with this substance, there are foods that help increase the natural production of dopamine in the body. You can also eat a variety of foods that help product this substance:

Dopamine-producing foods

You can also follow a variety of other health tips that will increase dopamine production:

  • Cut down on sugary and starchy foods, as well as those loaded with saturated fats.
  • Reduce intake of alcohol or caffeine (recommended to be avoided completely by depressed people).
  • Exercise on a regular basis.
  • Quit smoking.
  • Increase intake of fruits and vegetables.
  • Take precursors that help increase production of this neurotransmitter.
  • Talk to your doctor about ways you can increase production of this natural substance that is produced by your brain.
  • Make an effort to reduce stress in your life that could lead decline of production of this substance in your brain.

Signs of Dopamine Deficiency

You can very easily tell if your body does not product enough of this substance. Some ways you can tell include the following:

  • You have absolutely no motivation (maybe tired or depressed all the time).
  • Sometimes you fall pray to compulsive gambling, drinking, sexual activity or other additions.
  • Maybe you have too many cravings for the wrong foods.
  • You might not be able to move around normally.
  • Perhaps you think life is very dull, and you feel bored.
  • Sometimes affected people have trouble concentrating.
  • Other people are easily cold all the time
  • Weight gain happens too often than you would like.
  • You depend upon too many stimulants such as soda, coffee, nicotine or sugar

Treatment methods used to resolve this problem may vary. It may take several trips to the doctor as well as extended research to come up with an ideal treatment plan.

Once you are treated, however, your life is likely to change dramatically for the better. While seeking treatment you might be required to take a variety of tests, particularly one that evaluates the activity of your nervous system. This process is one of which you may need to be patient. It also might require a second opinion in some cases.

Useful References

Dong Quai Herb – Uses And Side Effects

Dong Quai

What is Dong quai ?

Dong quai comes from the roots of Angelica polymorpha var. sinensis, a fragrant perennial herb native to China, Korea, and Japan.

Common doses of Dong quai

Dong quai comes as tablets (fluid extract, 0.5 grams) and raw root (4.5 to 30 grams to be boiled or soaked in wine). In some countries, it also comes in injectable forms. In one study, people received a dose of 1 gram of the root.

Why people use Dong quai herb

  • Buerger’s disease (a condition of obstruction, inflammation, and blood clotting in a blood vessel)
  • Chronic runny nose
  • Constipation
  • Excessive fetal movement
  • Gynecologic disorders, such as irregular menstruation, painful menstruation. premenstrual syndrome, and chronic pelvic infection
  • Headache
  • Hepatitis
  • High blood pressure
  • Infections, including those producing pus
  • Liver cirrhosis
  • Malaria
  • Raynaud’s disease (a condition of intermittent slowing of blood flow to the fingers, toes, ears or nose)
  • Severe stabbing pains
  • Shingles
  • Toothache
  • Ulcers

Side effects of Dong quai

Call your health care practitioner if you experience any of these possible side effects of dong quai:

Interactions

Combining herbs with certain drugs may alter their action or produce unwanted side effects. Don’t use dong quai while taking blood thinners.

Important points to remember

  • Don’t ingest volatile oil of dong quai because one of its components can cause cancer.
  • Don’t use this herb if you’re pregnant or breast-feeding because it may harm the fetus. Report planned or suspected pregnancy.
  • Report unusual bleeding or bruising.
  • Know that some of the herb’s components increase the risk of certain cancers.
  • To help prevent skin sensitivity to sunlight, use sun block and wear adequate clothing and sunglasses.
  • Don’t use this herb for its estrogen-like effects because these effects haven’t been proven.

What the research shows

Only a few animal studies support the many therapeutic claims for dong quai. The herb seems to have more than 18 active chemical components, which exert widely divergent effects. Some components can cause cancer and others have unknown side effects. Extensive testing of individual components must be done before dong quai can be deemed safe or effective.

Other names for Dong quai : –

Other names for dong quai include Chinese angelica, drykuei, tang-kuei, and women’s ginseng.

Products containing dong quai are sold under such names as Dong K wai, Dong Quai Capsules, and Dong Quai Fluid Extract.

Useful References

Dill Herb – Uses And Side Effects

Dill

What is dill ?

Dill may have gotten its name from its sedative and antigas properties: The old Norse word dilla means “to lull.” In the Middle Ages, magicians used dill in potions and magic spells, and people grew the herb in their gardens to ward off witchcraft and enchantments.

All parts of the dill plant are used, but most dill products come from the dried ripe fruit, seeds, or flowers of Anethum graveolens, a member of the carrot family (Umbelliferae). Some people put dill in “gripe water,” which they give to infants to relieve gas and sharp intestinal pains. Dill also promotes milk flow in breastfeeding women and cattle.

Common doses of dill

Dill comes as dried fruit, distilled or concentrated dill water, and dill oil. Some experts recommend the following doses:

  • As dried fruit, 1 to 4 grams taken orally three times daily.
  • As distilled dill water, 2 to 4 milliliters taken orally three times daily.
  • As concentrated dill water, 0.2 milliliters taken orally three times daily.
  • As dill oil, 0.05 to 2 milliliters taken orally three times daily.

Why people use dill herb

  • Bad breath
  • Hiccups
  • Insomnia
  • Intestinal gas
  • Muscle spasms
  • Stomach pain
  • To aid digestion
  • To improve the appetite
  • To stimulate lactation
  • To strengthen nails

Side effects of dill

Call your health care practitioner if you experience unusual symptoms while using dill.

Interactions

Combining herbs with certain drugs may alter their action or produce unwanted side effects. Tell your health care practitioner about any prescription or nonprescription drugs you’re taking.

Important points to remember

  • Don’t use dill if you’re on a low-salt (low-sodium) diet because of its high sodium content.
  • Use dill cautiously if you’re allergic to other spices. Cross-sensitivity may occur.
  • Seek advice from your health care practitioner before taking dill.

What the research shows

The potential benefits of dill remain unproven. Most clinical data on this herb come from foreign sources or animal studies. No human data from the United States support the use of dill for intestinal gas or sharp intestinal pains in infants or as a milk flow stimulant. More studies must be done to determine if dill is safe or effective.

Other names for dill : –

Other names for dill include dill seed and dillweed.

Products containing dill are sold under such names as Atkinson & Barker’s Gripe Mixture, Concentrated Dill Water BPC 1973, Neo, Neo Baby Mixture, Nurse Harvey’s Gripe Mixture, and Woodwards Gripe Water.

Useful References

DHEA Herb – Uses And Side Effects

DHEA

What is DHEA ?

DHEA has been touted as an immune booster, an anti-aging miracle drug, and a treatment for many disorders ranging from depression to tumors. DHEA is made from steroid precursors found in the yam. Europe and China produce most of the commercially available DHEA.

Common doses of DHEA

DHEA is available as:

  • capsules (5, 25, or 50 milligrams)
  • timed-release tablets (15 milligrams)
  • cream (4 ounces, combined with other vitamins and herbs).

In most studies, people received a dose of 50 milligrams orally daily.

Why people use DHEA herb

Side effects of DHEA

Call your health care practitioner if you experience any of these possible side effects of DHEA:

  • excessive body hair growth
  • increased aggressiveness
  • insomnia
  • irritability.

Interactions

Combining herbs with certain drugs may alter their action or produce unwanted side effects. Tell your health care practitioner about any prescription or nonprescription drugs you’re taking, especially other androgen or estrogen hormones.

Important points to remember

  • Don’t use DHEA if you have prostate cancer, benign prostatic hypertrophy, or a breast or uterine tumor. DHEA may promote growth of these tumors.
  • Avoid this herb if you’re pregnant or breast-feeding.
  • If you’re over age 40, don’t take DHEA unless you’ve been screened aggressively for hormonally sensitive cancers.
  • Report mood or behavior changes to your health care practitioner.

What the research shows

Most claims for DHEA are based on laboratory and nonprimate studies. Although decreasing DHEA levels in humans may indicate aging and degenerative diseases, scientists lack conclusive evidence that DHEA can prevent or treat these diseases. They also know little about the safety of long-term DHEA use. Larger and more comprehensive trials are needed to determine an appropriate role for DHEA in medicine.

Other names for DHEA : –

DHEA is also called dehydroepiandrosterone.

Products containing Dhea are sold under such names as Born Again’s DHEA Eyelift Serum, DHEA Men’s Formula, DHEA with Antioxidants 25 milligrams and DHEA with Bioperine 50 milligrams.

Useful References

Devil’s Claw Herb – Uses And Side Effects

Devil's Claw Herb

What is devil’s claw ?

The hooks that cover the fruit of Harpagophytum procumbens, the source of devil’s claw, account for the herb’s odd name. The hooks promote the plant’s spread by animals. The drug is extracted from the roots and secondary tubers of H. procumbens, a member of the Pedalia family (Pedaliaceae).

Common doses of devil’s claw

Devil’s claw comes as:

In one study, people received 2,000 milligrams orally daily.

Why people use devil’s claw herb

  • Allergies
  • Arteriosclerosis (hardening of the arteries)
  • Arthritis
  • Boils
  • Digestive tract Problems
  • Headache
  • Heartburn
  • Kidney disorders
  • Liver disorders
  • Lumbago
  • Malaria
  • Menopause symptoms
  • Menstrual pain
  • Nicotine poisoning
  • Rheumatism
  • Severe stabbing pains
  • Skin cancer
  • To stimulate the appetite

Side effects of devil’s claw

Call your health care practitioner if you experience unusual symptoms when using devil’s claw.

Interactions

Combining herbs with certain drugs may alter their action or produce unwanted side effects. Tell your health care practitioner about any prescription or nonprescription drugs you’re taking, especially drugs for irregular heartbeats.

Important points to remember

  • Avoid devil’s claw if you have gastric or duodenal ulcers or if you’re breast-feeding.
  • Don’t use this herb if you’re pregnant, think you may be pregnant, or plan to become pregnant. Devil’s claw may stimulate uterine contractions and cause miscarriage.
  • If you’re using devil’s claw to ease inflammation, keep in mind that you may get better results by taking one of the many prescription or nonprescription drugs with known risks and benefits.

What the research shows

Except for a single study, scientists have no evidence that devil’s claw eases inflammation or has therapeutic value in treating any other disorder. Larger and well-designed clinical studies must be done to evaluate its safety and effectiveness in treating arthritis.

Other names for devil’s claw : –

Other names for devil’s claw include grapple plant and wood spider.

Products containing devil’s claw are sold under such names as Devil’s Claw, Devil’s Claw Capsule, Devil’s Claw Secondary Root, and Devil’s Claw Vegicaps.

Useful References

Dandelion Herb – Uses And Side Effects

dandelion

What is dandelion ?

A well-known herbal remedy and natural food item, dandelion is one of nine herbal ingredients in a British product used to treat viral hepatitis. Some people roast dandelion root and use it as a coffee substitute. Others make wine and schnapps from dandelion flowers or add the herb to soups and salads. Dandelion contains more vitamin A than carrots.

Active herbal components come from the leaves and roots of Taraxacum officinale or T. laevigatum. These common, low-growing weeds are native to Europe and Asia and naturalized worldwide.

Common doses of dandelion

Dandelion comes as capsules, extracts, and teas. Some experts recommend the following doses:

  • As dried root, 2 to 8 grams taken orally by infusion or decoction three times daily.
  • As dried leaf, 4 to 10 grams taken orally by infusion three times daily
  • As fluid extract (1: 1 in 25% alcohol), 4 to 8 milliliters (1 to 2 teaspoon) taken orally three times daily.
  • As tincture of root (1:5 in 45% alcohol), 5 to 10 milliliters taken orally three times daily.
  • As juice of root, 4 to 8 milliliters taken orally three times daily.

Why people use dandelion herb

  • Constipation
  • Digestive complaints
  • Fluid retention from premenstrual syndrome, heart failure, or high blood pressure
  • Gallbladder problems
  • Liver disorders
  • Rheumatism
  • To aid weight reduction to help remove corns, calluses, and warts
  • To stimulate bile production

Side effects of dandelion

Call your health care practitioner if you experience skin irritation when using dandelion.

Dandelion can also cause:

  • blockage of the digestive or biliary tract
  • gallbladder inflammation
  • gallstones.

Interactions

Combining herbs with certain drugs may alter their action or produce unwanted side effects. Don’t use dandelion while taking:

  • diuretics
  • drugs that lower blood pressure
  • drugs that lower blood sugar.

Important points to remember

  • Don’t use dandelion if you’re pregnant or breast-feeding.
  • If you have diabetes, check your blood sugar level carefully when using dandelion. The herb may make your blood sugar level drop too low.
  • If you’re taking dandelion along with a drug used to lower blood pressure, be aware that you may feel dizzy or lose consciousness briefly when rising from a sitting or lying position.

What the research shows

In a small group of patients, dandelion root successfully treated chronic nonspecific colitis (inflammation of the colon). In these patients, the herb relieved abdominal pain, constipation, and diarrhea.

Nonetheless, scientists have little information to justify dandelion’s reported therapeutic uses. Although the plant has been used in foods without side effects, medical experts caution against ingesting large amounts.

Other names for dandelion : –

Other names for dandelion include lion’s tooth, priest’s crown, and wild endive.

A product containing dandelion is sold as Dandelion.

Useful References