Aconite Herb – Uses And Side Effects

aconite

What is Aconite?

Aconite comes from the leaves, flowers, and roots of Aconitum napellus, an erect perennial with tuberous roots. This herb is native to the mountainous regions of North America, Europe, Japan, China, and India.

Aconite was first used medicinally in the 1800s. However, because it can be toxic, It’s not recommended for any medicinal use. In fact, this herb was once used as a poison in arrows and has been linked to many suicides.

Common doses of aconite

Aconite is available as a tincture, a tea, and a liniment. However, experts warn against using this herb in any form.

Why people use aconite herb

Side effects of aconite

If you or someone you’re with has taken aconite, get immediate medical help if any of these side effects occurs :-

  • Blurred vision
  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Slow heartbeat
  • throat closure
  • Weakness

Aconite also can cause low blood potassium, resulting in irregular heartbeats, weakness and flaccid muscles.

Interactions

Combining herbs with certain drugs may alter their action or produce unwanted side effects. Don’t use aconite while taking:

  • drugs for irregular heartbeats.
  • drugs that lower blood pressure.

Important points to remember

  • Know that death can result from using as little as 5 milliliters of aconite tincture, 2 milligrams of pure aconite, I gram of crude plant parts, or 6 grams of cured aconite.
  • Don’t use aconite to treat any condition, especially if you have heart disease, irregular heartbeats, blood vessel disease, poor circulation, or a known allergy to this herb.
  • Don’t use aconite if you’re pregnant or breast-feeding.
  • If you grow aconite, restrict it to the garden. Handle the plant only when wearing gloves that slow absorption of plant oils through the skin.

What the research shows

Information linking aconite with death points out the danger of using this herb. Aconite has no therapeutic value and poses a grave threat to anyone who uses even small amounts.

Other names for aconite herb: –

Other names for aconite include mar’s cap, helmet flower, monkshood, soldier’s cap, and wolfsbane.

No products containing aconite are available commercially in the United States.

Useful References

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